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Neighborhoods

Queen City Historic District

The Queen City Historic District, whose buildings date from 1905 to 1929, is the earliest African-American community that survives in South Dallas. The district is situated along four blocks of Atlanta Street from Cooper Street on the northwest to Eugene Street on the southwest, as well as the 3700 block of Dildock Street parallel to and immediately east of Atlanta Street.

Queen City is composed of several additions. The district emerged from the former farming community called the Prairie, which was settled during the Reconstruction-era and centered along Greer Avenue (now Metropolitan). Good examples of vernacular and period-plan houses may be seen throughout the district. The most popular architectural styles in the district include Craftsman bungalow, Shotgun, and Pyramidal styles.

Many church congregations established in the late 1800s survive, although new buildings have replaced the original ones. The Queen City Historic District is listed on the National Register as the historic center of the African-American community in South Dallas and for its influence on subsequent African-American additions in the area.

Queen City has also seen some new, compatible construction. Three examples of new houses designed in the Craftsman bungalow style now exist on Atlanta Street. These houses were built as part of the Community Development Partnership, an alliance between the federal and local government, banks, businesses, and foundations, whose goal is to provide housing opportunities to low- to moderate-income families in South Dallas.

The Park South Family YMCA is located on Romine Avenue and provides community programs such as after-school care and educational activities to the neighborhood and surrounding population.

The Queen City neighborhood is at the heart of the historic South Dallas African-American community. It possesses a strong sense of identity. Currently street sign toppers appear at major intersections and identify the neighborhood as Queen City.

Works Cited:
National Register Multiple Property Listing Historic and Architectural Resources of East and South Dallas, Dallas
County, Texas, 1990. 1995.
Preservation Dallas Vertical Files, 2006.

Author: Sarah Sibley
Editor: Michael Hazel
Photographs by: Discover Dallas! Volunteers




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